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The Office of Student Scholarship, Creative Activity, and Research (OSCAR) Celebration Resources

A video presentation is taking a face-to-face sharing of your research findings (a poster, a short presentation, a three-minute thesis) and moving that to a set video presentation about your research.

Explanation

It can be hard to conceptualize what this video presentation could look like. Below we have included some of the Top Presentation winners for Summer 2021. You can use these examples to inspire your work, but don't copy them directly. Your presentation should be tailored to your specific research or creative project. Each Mason student project below chooses a unique way to tell the narrative of their research visually.

Examples from George Mason Students

OSCAR Grant project: THE ASPERA GROUP

Casper Brooks

NNA Corpus Video 1: Intro to Linguistic Corpus

Hannah Brennan, Domi Hannon, Bren Yaghmour, Jaxon Myers

Analyzing the Microbiome of Avian Schistosomiasis Vector Gyraulus Parvus

Louise Singer

Non George Mason University Examples

Below are some examples from students at different universities. Please note that these might not exactly follow the rules required by our program and are only included to give you inspiration for types of ways you could visually display your research. Since they do not necessarily conform to the expectations and requirements of the OSCAR Celebration, below the links are the salient points to take away from each presentation.

Cosmic Bullets | Detection of Particles from Outer Space

Zoe de Beurs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7S2A3mT6xPw&feature=youtu.be

Things to notice in this example: 

  • The student uses outside expert footage to help explain their research. There are many sources for free video footage that you can incorporate into your presentation, some of which can be found in the resources section later on in this document. The student has a great speech pace, sounds excited but doesn’t speak too quickly or too slowly, and has items of visual interest in frame when she is talking without overshadowing the content she is trying to share.

Engineering Bee Gut Microbes to Affect their Hosts

Stratton Georgoulis

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ucc1a7AIFcI

Things to notice in this example: 

  • Thorough explanation of project, good pacing with speech, good use of outside video to enrich the explanation, and simple animation to explain point. There are several ways to put animation in your presentation, there are some ways listed in the resources in the general resources tab.

Benefits of Iconicity for Comprehension of a Signed Second Language

Emily Saunders

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRw0yI8U19Q&feature=youtu.be

Things to notice in this example: 

  • This is a great example of a very straight forward explanation of student research. The student does a great job explaining their work and its larger impact. Their speech is very well paced, their tone and energy is very engaging, and their background is interesting without being overshadowing. They made a smart choice dubbing over their video, the audio done filming in an outside environment would have been loud and crowded.

Networking Texas

Iman Shah

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tU7qQH6y1Is&feature=youtu.be

Things to notice in this example: 

  • This is an example of a student not including footage of themselves within their presentation and has great examples of other ways to visually fill the time and explain their project. Notice that they created several graphic heavy fliers that they put in, and then scanned down to show their information but also include movement. They also used several simple animations that can be done in PowerPoint or other free animation resources, links in the resources section.

Hexavalent Chromate in the Godavari River

Satya Shantimayi

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Or8sYmyz8BA&feature=youtu.be

Things to notice in this example: 

  • This student took a creative approach and animated their research by hand, speeding up the video and cutting unnecessarily part like changing to new paper to ensure they stayed in their time limit. This is a very low-tech way to explain the research you are doing in a visual format. Also notice that they included soft background music, royalty free background music can be found in a link in the resources, to cover up any awkward gaps or pauses in their speech. 

Studio Brazil – Art and Ore

Julio Roman

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMY2bDcdKHM&feature=youtu.be

Things to notice in this example: 

  • This example highlights how you can incorporate creative works into your video research presentations. The study included several time-lapses of their creative works to fit the time limit of their video, along with background information and what their creative works were related to. They also used music to engage with the audience, and inspire a certain emotional state to go along with their visual art.